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The GuildsEdit

Run by a Council of Mages (or whatever you decide), the Guild is in the business of training, research, community support and diplomacy. It has an open-door policy and any member of the public can petition the guild for support. Those petitions are reviewed and voted on in a monthly meeting by the Council. The guild can grant access to research facilities, laboratories, special materials, and spell components. Though the particular laws of any given wizards' guilds are campaign specific, here are a few ideas:

  • Wizards' guilds limit who can make what magical items

  • They restrict what level of spells a wizard can cast for hire, depending on level or status in the guild.

  • They regulate the prices at which wizards sell magic items, potions, scrolls, or spells they cast from memory.

  • They determine who can create new spells and what new spells are created.

  • They determine who becomes a wizard, through controlling membership and taking on apprentices.

Mages who are not guild members and enter the city (or area) will be approached by a group of mages whose sole purpose is to recruit. They are tipped off by the Watch, who keeps a close eye on anyone entering the city.

A typical Guild Structure:

(these level titles are taken from 1e)

  • (Level 1) Magic-Users: These are the newest members of the guild. They have very few rights.
  • (Level 2) Prestidigitator: These are the recruiters mentioned above.
  • (Level 3) Conjurer: These work directly with the public to fulfill petitions.
  • (Level 4-6) Arcanist: These are involved in low-level research.
  • (Level 7-9) Spellmaster: These are involved in mid-level research.
  • (Level 10) Magician: These are teachers for the lower level mages.
  • (Level 11) Evoker: These are generally involved in field research.
  • (Level 12) Thaumaturgist: These generally deal with in-house transgressions and punishments.
  • (Level 13-15) Magus: These are teachers for the mid-level mages.
  • (Level 16-17) Sorcerer: These are engaged in high-level research
  • (Level 18) Mage: These form part of the Council. They also teach the high-level mages.
  • (Level 19) Wizard: These form part of the Council.
  • (Level 20) Arch-mage: This is the head of the guild.

MembershipEdit

Entry Level Membership: 1st Level, 6 month probationary periodEdit

-Enrolment Dues: 200gp or minor magical item

-Nomination Dues: 100-500gp

Requirements:

-Wizard or Sorcerer

-Must be Nominated by an existing member of 5th rank or higher.

-Must perform one or more deeds for the guild to advance in rank.

-Cannot refuse any reasonable request from higher ranking guild members.

Benefits:

-Allowed to wear broach, cloak or symbol of Guild.

-Discounts on meals, room, and board at selected merchants.

-Limited access to a standard library. Can add 2 free spells per month to your spellbook. Must pay 500gp/level of spell beyond that.

-Limited access to alchemists laboratory. 2 free potions a month.

-Limited dorm access (no more than 2 nights in a row for any dorm).

-Free Evening-feast meals at Guild Hall on weekends.

-Free admission to parties, balls, or galas held by the guild.

-Access to social circles above his station as long as the proper attire and etiquette is followed.

Advanced Level Membership: 9th level, 6 month probationary periodEdit

-Enrolment Dues: 2000gp or major magical item

-Nomination Dues: 1000-5000gp

Requirements:

-Wizard or Sorcerer

-Must be Nominated by an existing member of 15th level or higher.

-Must perform one or more deeds for the guild to advance in rank.

-Cannot refuse any reasonable request from higher ranking guild members.

Benefits:

-Allowed to wear broach, cloak or symbol of Guild.

-Discounts on meals, room, and board at selected merchants.

-Full access to a standard library and full access to restricted library. Can add 4 free spells per month to your spellbook. Must pay 500gp/level of spell beyond that.

-Full access to alchemists laboratory. 4 free potions a month.

-Full dorm access.

-Free Evening-feast meals at Guild Hall, daily.

-Free admission to parties, balls, or galas held by the guild.

-Access to social circles above his station as long as the proper attire and etiquette is followed.


Courses in a Typical Academy CurriculumEdit

Guilds generally sponsor magic academies, as the influx of new students is vital to keeping the Guild's influence and power at a premium. The course of study varies from academy to academy, but most include the classes described below. Usually, all of these classes are required to graduate, but the DM might decide to vary them according to the needs of a specific student or the educational philosophy of a particular faculty. The length of time necessary to graduate also varies from school to school, depending on the student's aptitude, the intensity of the training, and the quality of the faculty, but generally, four to six years of full-time study are required to graduate from an accredited academy. This period can be lengthened by as much as two to four additional years if the student specializes in a particular school. A student usually takes four to six courses per quarter, with each quarter lasting three months. A minor course, such as Survey of Literature, might last only a single quarter, while a major course, such as Spell Tutorial, might be taken every quarter until the student graduates. An average course lasts one to two hours per day, four to six days per week.

The curriculum of a typical academy of magic includes the following courses:

  1. Physical Training: Various exercises and activities to improve physical fitness, with an emphasis on dexterity training for manipulation of spell components.

  2. Philosophy of Magic: The study of logical methods of thinking with applications to practical problems of spell use. Exploration of metaphysics, theory of knowledge, and ethics.

  3. Basic Astrology: The relationship of the stars, planets, and other heavenly bodies to magical processes. Topics include lunar phases, astral movement, and the influence of deities.

  4. Spell Theory: How spells function; spell interaction with physical laws.

  5. Fundamentals of Meditation: Basic techniques for reaching higher levels of intellectual perception. Topics include transcendence, self-actualization, and dream analysis.

  6. Language Instruction: Grammar, phonetics, and conversational idioms of human, humanoid, and demihuman languages.

  7. History of Magic: Overview of wizards and magic throughout the ages with an emphasis on historical breakthroughs in spell research.

  8. Magic and Society: The wizard as viewed from a cultural perspective. A survey of societal relationships and cross- cultural comparisons of wizards around the world(s).

  9. Power Thinking: Emphasis on increasing the student's understanding of thinking as a process to increase the strength of his cognitive skills. Topics include creativity, memory, concentration, and problem solving.

  10. Survey of Literature: An introduction to the study of magic literature, with an emphasis on analysis. A broad range of authors from a variety of cultures and historical periods are examined in detail.

  11. Library Instruction: A survey of research techniques, including classification systems, spell indexing, basic reference books, and assembling a personal library.

  12. Fundamentals of Spell Transcription: Topics include penmanship techniques, paper and ink selection, proper structure, revision, basic calligraphy, and proofreading.

  13. Principles of Casting: An introduction to basic casting techniques of low-level spells. Includes component theory, spell design, and safety procedures. Instruction for specific schools of magic are available for prospective specialists.

  14. Spell Tutorial: An individualized course tailored to meet the needs of individual students. Students can concentrate on improving skills in specific schools of magic or explore techniques from all schools.

  15. Spell Seminar: A discussion group addressing topics of special interest to students, with an emphasis on problem areas. Students are expected to conduct demonstrations for the group, with criticism periods to follow.

  16. Spell Practicum: Addressing low-level spells, the practicum provides students with the opportunity to practice their skills in both a laboratory setting and in the field. Emphasis is on creative application.

  17. Formula Analysis: Theory of spell formulas, emphasizing techniques applicable to original research. Topics include elementary spell functions, tabular and graphical presentation, variability, and metaphysical equations. Basic alchemical principles are covered in subsequent sessions of this course.

  18. Laboratory Techniques: Practical application of the principles covered in Formula Analysis. Topics include herbalism, alchemical reactions, natural and unnatural metabolism, and basic scientific procedures (all alchemical processes described earlier in this chapter).

  19. Introduction to 1st-Level Magic: 1st-level spell instruction. Includes casting techniques, practical applications, and general theory. Individualized instruction available.

  20. Interplanar Theory & Practicum: Discussion of planar travel and theories of planar spell workings. Includes conversions for spells based on planar loci.